Silent Hill: The Terror Engine by Bernard Perron

Silent Hill: The Terror Engine, is both a close analysis of the first three Silent Hill games and a general look at the whole series. Perron situates the games within the survival horror genre, both by looking at the history of the genre and by comparing Silent Hill with such important forerunners as Alone in the Dark and Resident Evil. Taking a transmedia approach and underlining the designer’s cinematic and literary influences, he uses the narrative structure; the techniques of imagery, sound, and music employed; the game mechanics; and the fiction, artifact, and gameplay emotions elicited by the games to explore the specific fears survival horror games are designed to provoke and how the experience as a whole has made the Silent Hill series one of the major landmarks of video game history.

I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream by Harlan Ellison

Among Ellison’s more famous stories, two consistently noted as his very best ever are the Hugo Award–winning, postapocalyptic title story of this collection of seven shorts and the volume’s concluding story, “Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes.” Since Ellison himself strongly resists categorization of his work, we will not call them science fiction, or SF, or speculative fiction or horror or anything else except compelling reading experiences that are utterly unique. They could only have been written by the great Harlan Ellison, and they are incomparably original.

What to Do When You Meet Cthulhu [A guide to surviving the Cthulhu Mythos] by Rachel Gray

Providing insight into the famed Cthulhu mythos of H. P. Lovecraft as well as the countless mythical threats that creep among Earth’s population, this comprehensive handbook explores the transdimensional beings, subterranean creatures, and fantastical beasts that lurk in the corners of time. From encounters with Barnabas Marsh and Wilbur Whateley to dangerous seaside communities, this witty exploration covers the multitude of imaginary dangers, escape options, and chances of survival when confronting these horrors. Shoggoths, Nightgaunts, ghouls, and Cthulhu all have ventured into popular culture in the form of cuddly toys, but as this entertaining overview proves, these monsters are not so warm and fuzzy when met face-to-face, face-to-muzzle, or face-to-tentacles. Authoritative and hilarious, this “survival guide” sheds light on the mysterious and often unimaginable world of Cthulhu.

The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

Inspired by a true story of a child’s demonic possession in the 1940s, William Peter Blatty created an iconic novel that focuses on Regan, the eleven-year-old daughter of a movie actress residing in Washington, D.C. A small group of overwhelmed yet determined individuals must rescue Regan from her unspeakable fate, and the drama that ensues is gripping and unfailingly terrifying.

The Blood Confession by Alisa M. Libby

Born under the omen of a falling star, Erzebet Bizecka is a child of prophecy. The only heir of a powerful Hungarian count, she was predicted to die young or to live forever. Determined to survive despite the grim prophecy, Erzebet becomes obsessed with preserving her youth and beauty. Not even her closest friend, Marianna, can understand her crippling fear of growing older. Only the beautiful stranger, Sinestra, understands Erzebet’s mania. He assures her that there are ways to determine her own destiny, pulling her into a dark world of blood rituals and promising eternal youth in return. Luring her victims to her tower room, Erzebet is determined to thwart God’s plan for her life and create her own. How far will she be willing to go to protect herself?

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Bod is an unusual boy who inhabits an unusual place—he’s the only living resident of a graveyard. Raised from infancy by the ghosts, werewolves, and other cemetery denizens, Bod has learned the antiquated customs of his guardians’ time as well as their ghostly teachings—such as the ability to Fade so mere mortals cannot see him. Can a boy raised by ghosts face the wonders and terrors of the worlds of both the living and the dead? And then there are being such as ghouls that aren’t really one thing or the other.

The Cthulhu Mythos Encyclopedia by Daniel Harms

The third edition of this popular and extensive encyclopedia of the Cthulhu Mythos—updated with more fiction listings and recent material—this book spans the years of H. P. Lovecraft’s influence in culture, entertainment, and fiction. The expansive entries make this reference invaluable for anyone knowledgeable about the Cthulhu Mythos and a much-needed resource for those longing to learn about the cosmic horrors from past and present decades.

Imajica by Clive Barker

Imajica is an epic beyond compare: vast in conception, obsessively detailed in execution, and apocalyptic in its resolution. At its heart lies the sensualist and master art forger, Gentle, whose life unravels when he encounters Judith Odell, whose power to influence the destinies of men is vaster than she knows, and Pie ‘oh’ pah, an alien assassin who comes from a hidden dimension. That dimension is one of five in the great system called Imajica. They are worlds that are utterly unlike our own, but are ruled, peopled, and haunted by species whose lives are intricately connected with ours. As Gentle, Judith, and Pie ‘oh’ pah travel the Imajica, they uncover a trail of crimes and intimate betrayals, leading them to a revelation so startling that it changes reality forever.

The Wager by Donna Jo Napoli

Don Giovanni was once the wealthiest and handsomest young man in Messina. Then a tidal wave changed everything. When a well-dressed stranger offers him a magical purse, he knows he shouldn’t take it. Only the devil would offer a deal like this, and only a fool would accept. Don Giovanni is no fool, but he is desperate. He takes the bet: he will not bathe for 3 years, 3 months, and 3 days. Beauty is a small price to pay for worldly wealth, isn’t it? Unless he loses the wager―and with it his soul.

The Necronomicon by Abdul Alhazred

H.P. Lovecraft himself denied the Book’s existence, but the dreaded Necronomicon has surfaced. Written in Damascus in the Eighth Century A.D. by the ‘Mad Arab’ Abdul Alhazred, the accused volume is filled with myths and rituals that have survived the darkest days of magic and occultism – long-forgotten formulae for evoking incredible things, beings, and monster into physical appearance. It also includes the formulae for spiritual trans-formation, consistent with some of the most ancient mystical processes in the world, processes that were not public knowledge when the book was first published, and processes that involve communion with the stars. Now welcome the most famous, potent, and potentially, the most dangerous Black Book known to the Western World.